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Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Headline Trip

  • Two biographies on the late, great Isabella Blow to hit bookshelves next year. [NY Observer]
  • Ryan McGinley and ever-androgynous Tilda Swinton to collaborate on women's and men's ad campaigns for Pringle of Scotland. [WWD]
  • Living up to her mag's name, Katie Grand got married to longtime beau, Pulp bass player Steve Mackey, and shows us the love. [LOVE blog]
  • Johanna Stickland "gives a big fuck you to the dude outside my window late last night singing the song from Cats." [Facebook]
  • A miniature greenhouse, taxidermy and the British flag defaced by John Galliano are just some of the props for sale at SHOWstudio. [SHOWstudio]

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    Saturday, June 27, 2009

    Paris Men's Week: John Galliano

    Deep in the heart of Paris' 16th arrondissement is the Piscine Molitor, a graffiti-covered carcass of an indoor pool, known for its deco décor and as the site where, in 1945, the bikini first appeared. Its resonance must have appealed to John Galliano, who staged another one of his epic men's shows here.

    Galliano designs for men like a wide-eyed boy steeped in tales of daring heroism. There were two characters on his mind this season: Lawrence of Arabia, as portrayed by Peter O'Toole in the 1962 classic, and Napoleon Bonaparte in Abel Gance's haunting 1927 silent film. Galliano began with Lawrence, who went native in a mix of early 20th-century military tailoring and harem-like sarouel pants—worn out, distressed, exotic. And he ended up with a goth Bonaparte as the Emperor of France, a menacing regal figure in brocade evening shirts with jet black embroidery and great coats with still more shirts wrapped around them like sashes. Somewhere in between he slipped in a Sicilian escapade inspired by the pre-WWI homoerotic portraits of Wilhelm von Gloeden, whose juvenile models with wreaths in their hair evoked Grecian antiquity. Galliano's Sicilians, however, were in floral speedos and blousy scarf-print blousons—mama mia!

    —Rebecca Voight



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    Monday, June 1, 2009

    Headline Trip

  • Following Burberry last week, today it was announced that Matthew Williamson will return to London Fashion Week in September, celebrating LFW's 25th anniversary, after seven years in New York.
  • John Galliano, too, will show his Christian Dior couture collection at the Dior salon on Avenue Montaigne for the first time in ten years. [WWD]
  • Forgetting who's modeled in her collections, Vivienne Westwood asked "Who is Daisy Lowe?" at her son's art opening. But really, who can keep track? [The Sun]
  • Apparently Forbes can. They've counted down the highest paid models in the last year. Even without Victoria's Secret, Gisele scores an easy win. [Forbes]
  • What better time than retirement (yes, people, it's true) for a monograph on Maison Martin Margiela? Conceived as a work of art—with an embroidered white-linen cover, ribbon markers, twelve booklets and silver ink—it drops in October. [Rizzoli]
  • Giedre Dukauskaite, Lithuanian model and face of Prada, heads to Women agency.


  • Giedre Dukauskaite

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    Monday, May 18, 2009

    Freak Show

    Lions and tigers...er, patterns and colors and armor, oh my! Illustrations by Kuanth


    dress Christopher Kane
    dress Chanel, hat John Galliano, shoes (orange) Lanvin, shoes (yellow) Pierre Hardy, boots Bruno Frisoni



    dress & shoes Alexander McQueen, hat Dior
    dress & shoes Balmain, tights Jean Paul Gaultier



    dress Basso & Brooke
    dress Gareth Pugh


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    Saturday, May 9, 2009

    Bohaning Up

    Christian Dior has remained one of the most enduring names in modern fashion since his first collection in 1947, in which he reversed the codes of femininity with his famous New Look. Upon his death ten years later, a gifted teenager—perhaps too gifted—took the reins: Yves Saint Laurent. A remarkable shift occurred, but Saint Laurent didn't last long before he exited in a brouhaha involving the army, a broken promise, a lawsuit and another designer by the name of Marc Bohan.

    Dior's new star couturier, Bohan remained at the helm for the next 28 years before the arrival of Gianfranco Ferré and John Galliano. A new exhibit at Musée Christian Dior (that's right, he has his own museum) in Grandville, Normandy, showcases Bohan's contributions to Dior over three decades, from the classic elegance of the 1960s, through the bohemian chic of the 70s, to the baroque extravagance of the 80s—and of course his famous collaborations with photographer Dominique Issermann. Through September 20, 2009.

    —Laurent Dombrowicz






    photo by Dominique Issermann

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    Friday, March 6, 2009

    Paris Fashion Week: Christian Dior

    No matter what John Galliano throws down the catwalk at Christian Dior, the lead-up is enjoyment enough. Where's Waldo could entertain us for hours. Waldo, of course being the celebrity guest, difficult to spot among the throng of photographers, flashing lights and the innocent bystanders just trying to find their seats. But apart from Charlize Theron, Milla Jovovich and Eva Green, there were some clothes, too.

    Galliano is on an Oriental trip for fall '09, a collection rich with Imperialism, with a flap of the 20s. The show opened subtly with Astrakhan lambswool, rich brocade, Ikat jacquard, pinstripes and ottoman wool—all in the signature Dior gray—but it soon transformed through paisley print dresses into a China of the 20s. Fur capes and tulle jackets were belted tightly over heavy silk harem trousers in dove gray, exaggerated floral prints and binding heels.

    But the final stop of the tour had more of an Indian vibe, as a bright flurry of embroidered chiffon dresses in peach, purple, blue, cerise and white swept down the runway. Milla gasped and clutched her chest; others were more taken with the heavy silver neckpieces. Galliano, of course, took to the runway after a long pause, a build-up of expensive lighting and what might as well have been a drumroll, but his top hat and Japanese tails were, for him, a disappointment. We'd have much preferred if he took his bow as a Chinese emperor—well, a Dior Emperor at least.


    Dior

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    Saturday, January 10, 2009

    Keeping Up with Stephen Jones

    Because you asked, here's a progress report on friend and milliner (and Hinterview subject) Stephen Jones, who has a major retrospective coming up at London's Victoria & Albert museum, timed to coincide with London Fashion Week. Considering he supplies the hats (usually large, complicated, highly festooned concoctions) for a half dozen labels each season—i.e. Marc Jacobs, John Galliano, Giles—that means he's busier than a one-legged stripper, to use a drag colloquialism we know he'd appreciate.

    But first up, he's working on the hats for Dior's pre-fall collection next Thursday, as well as Dior's couture show later this month. He says the latter haven't been drawn up yet, just abstracted, which we think means wish-listed. But even before Couture Week comes Men's Week, and Stephen has Galliano Homme, Walter Van Beirendonck and Comme des Garçons booked, plus a surprise. Well, yes, a surprise, but it's the designer's first foray into menswear, so we'll give you two guesses who it could be.

    Stephen's own fall collection, called Albertopolis (Queen Victoria's nickname for South Kensington), mirrors the 300 or so hats of his V&A exhibit. The concept is a reinterpretation of past hats for today, including those inspired by Schiaparelli and geometry to familiar pieces worn by Madonna, Boy George and other slebs. It's Stephen's world; we just live in it.

    photo by Justine

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    Tuesday, September 30, 2008

    Paris Fashion Week: Dior

    Pia Catton flirts back...

    Oh, those swishy little skirts at Dior! John Galliano's diaphanous and pleated silk skirts—let's be accurate and call them minis—peaked out underneath studded, belted and fitted jackets, plus a few dramatic bodices. Too bad the Met's Superheroes exhibit closed already as this collection is prime material for the power-suited Wonder Woman in all of us—at least from the waist up. Below the belt, there was more flirty thigh-skimming on Dior's runway than a college cheerleading squad. Not that long skirts can't flirt: several sheer flowing skirts offered a view to the boy-cut underoos underneath.

    Galliano's tribal inspiration included the use of bright yellow, orange and blue. (And it puts Carla Bruni’s all-plum ensembles into perspective. This is a rich Dior color spectrum.) But the tribalism raises a question: how much will a Park Avenue hostess want her Dior cocktail dresses bedazzled with the same seashells from her daughter's brush with dreadlocks at spring break? Whatever, no quibbling with genius, especially when it leads to halter tops embroidered so finely that they shine like mesh. Same goes for entire coats made of python. Same goes for the sheer gown embroidered with horizontal black stripes that contrasted against the flesh to imply an animalism.

    By my count, there were two pairs of pants in 45 looks, and they were painted-on black jersey. Which makes a certain amount of sense in the Galliano-for-Dior worldview. Legs are there to be seen. Makes you wonder how long the baggy, boyfriend jean trend will last. After all, ZZ Top never wrote a song about ankles.

    —Pia Catton

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    Monday, April 21, 2008

    You saw a few baubles on John Galliano's fall runway, but here's your first good look at the dagger, flower and coin motifs that make up the high-end new line...



    And here's what John has to say...

    “Attention to every detail has always been so important, from the dress, the hair, the heels, the handbag, every detail matters. Top to toe, I want to know every detail of her story, so I am really excited that we are launching our own jewelry line this autumn. It's something that I have wanted to do for a long time."

    “We looked at trinkets, secrets, forbidden objects and disguises. I wanted to create something new, a new treasure for her to covet. I like to mix what people expect from Galliano with what they don’t. I like my designs to be provocative, to mix romance with attitude, decadence with eccentricity, the refined with the raw. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, after all.”

    “The inspiration is very much the essence of Galliano. It combines art and myths, baroque and gothic influences, beauty and elegance, all the things I love in three key themes.”

    “I have always thought of myself as an adventurer. I plunder the globe looking for inspiration. A pirate is glamorous and charming, so the dagger collection takes inspiration from this seductive personality, as well as the famous dagger of Topkapi.”

    “The flower collection shows the softer, more romantic side of Galliano. This is ultra luxe, ultra feminine for that perfect final precious bloom to add sparkle to flounces and frills.”

    “The coin collection really mixes elements of vintage and travel, of all the exotic coins you collect, barter and exchange, old and new. We have even franked our own Galliano mint, and its own rich heraldic refinement.”

    “I am so thrilled to have been able to produce this jewelry line. I think it shows another side to Galliano. Galliano girls are very ethereal, very romantic, and very after-dark. It's good they now have their own jewels to set of their unique style!”

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    Sunday, March 9, 2008

    Part two of stylist Haidee Findlay-Levin's tips for fall...

    FACE THE DARKNESS
    Okay, I know I said earlier that color is back for fall. And it is, but so is black. Stop your groaning—the black dress never looked better. It was skillfully laser-cut at Balenciaga (left), skimmed the body at Sophia Kokosalaki and draped to the floor at Junya Watanabe. It was in divine Spanish lace at Givenchy and heavy tablecloth lace at Prada. The opening dress at Alexander McQueen, made from layers and layers of soft tulle, was reminiscent of a black crow, though it was hardly the only exquisitely gothic dress in the collection. The mohair-lace dress stretched over layers of tulle, like one of Degas’ ballerinas in silhouette, was especially to-die-for. But perhaps the most exquisite black dresses walked Lanvin's runway; my two favorites were a wet-look wrap dress and a one-shouldered silk satin shift with a heavy fur cuff on its one side.

    GET A BLACK EYE
    Brace yourself for black eyes this fall. And I'm not talking gobs of Amy Winehouse eyeliner, no matter how well she sang at the Fendi store launch party during Paris Fashion Week. I'm talking kohl eyes, the classic kind found at Givenchy, as well as the perfect cat eyes at Balenciaga. (When replicating, please don’t get carried away like one recent fashion show attendee who not only completely painted his face white—yes, he's male—but dons a Shirley Temple wig.) Blackened eyes do require a nude or beige mouth, like the kind found at Rick Owens, but if you have to have a layer on your lips, go all the way with ink-black glossy lips like those at Yves Saint Laurent.

    FADE TO GRAY
    If goth isn’t your thing, choose from the endless permutations of gray seen on the runways: slate, charcoal, heather, lilac and mauve. Junya Watanabe (left) committed fully to a collection of no-color to illustrate his deft cutting and draping, taking it so far as to completely wrap the girls' heads and faces in sheer gray fabric with mini-boxes piled high on their heads, to sculptural effect.

    RIDE THE PONY
    With the severity of cut this season, and the attention paid to minimalism and the back, the only hair to wear is a ponytail. Not the high, Blonde Ambition version, but a simple ponytail worn on the side and secured at the nape of the neck. Miu Miu even showed the ponytail peeking out of neoprene swim caps. The only other acceptable version would be a small knot or chignon, also worn low and tight. So no more Barbie hair or updos. And please no more big Oscar hair—ever!

    TURN LOOSE
    This has been one of the most creative seasons for pants in ages, with designers really experimenting with fullness. The best baggy pants came from Louis Vuitton, especially when slightly drop-waisted and pleated. Those in shiny black leather with a slightly pegged leg were absolutely stunning, reminiscent of that Grace Jones/Thierry Mugler/Claude Montana era. My other favorites were over at Yves Saint Laurent, shown slightly cropped and higher in the waist. Haider Ackermann pushed his baggy pants high above the knee, like puffy shorts worn over leather leggings. There were Houri trousers in velvet devoré, as well as printed chiffon versions, at John Galliano, and narrow gray flannel pant-skirts at Junya Watanabe, which ended in an extremely low crotch. Meanwhile, at both Givenchy and Alexander McQueen, pants were skinny, black and high-wasted and mostly in leather or brocade. Maison Martin Margiela went super-sexy and offered leather pants complete with zippers snaking up the back of the leg like seamed stockings. And how can we ignore his other offering, the asymmetric one-legged bodysuit in a multitude of prints?

    DROP YOUR SKIRTS
    I know it seems passé to talk skirt lengths in this day and age, but here it is: skirt lengths will definitely drop. I'm not talking red-carpet gowns here, but floor-grazing, skinny column dresses at Sophia Kokosalaki, which save their intricate detail for the collar. There was also the black dress that opened her show, seemingly suspended by a single diagonal strap and falling well below the knee. Dries Van Noten, too, showed high-necked column dresses that ended mid-calf, just short of ankle socks and heavy strappy sandals. At Louis Vuitton there were some knee-length bell skirts, but it was all about ballerina-length dirndls that stood away from the hips, while at Lanvin (left) the length was kept just above the knee with sexy and tight hobble skirts made up of bands of horizontal ribbon.

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