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Friday, June 19, 2009

More from Pitti...

Florentine festivities continued last night with yet another art-meets-fashion presentation. Proenza Schouler showed their spring 2010 pre-collection at the 16th-century Villa La Petraia, marking the fourth anniversary of Pitti Woman and the launch of the latest A magazine from Belgium, which they guest curated—as if we needed any more excuses to get folly-jolly.

“We decided to invite our three favorite artists rather than doing a runway show,” explained Jack McCollough at the press conference in the morning. Never mind that this was the duo's first European show; a crew of New York darlings was flown in, including Chloe Sevigny (who starred in Kalup Linzy’s film that screened on the terrace), Haim Steinbach (who created an indoor installation) and Kembra Pfahler, who gave Italians a raucous performance with her all-girl troupe, The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black.

—Kasia Bobula


Proenza Schouler's Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez


Proenza Schouler accessories exhibit


With Liya Kabede


The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black


The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black

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Friday, March 6, 2009

Never Too Old for Macaroons

Pamela Anderson, the busty 42-year-old femme fatale, pranced around Vivienne Westwood's catwalk in a tutu, proving that the notion of over-the-hill is over-the-hill. There's also been a runway revival of sorts for a couple of veteran models. Erin Wasson may have RVCA, but she also walked for Balmain, and mother of two Liya Kebede opened for Balenciaga. And let's not forget those Louis Vuitton ads with Madonna. Oh, cougars.

Otherwise, Bernhard Willhelm's collection was one part greatest hits, one part more of the same. If you haven't picked up a piecey Willhelm tartan plaid dress yet, don't worry, there are plenty more to come for fall. There were also gold, life-size banana barrettes and sheer multi-colored hoods topping an array of dip-dyed tunics and argyle knits.

Like many Paris designers, Romeo Gigli spun the idea of menswear for his first collection for Io Ipse Idem: angular shoulders on blazers, impeccable men's suiting and beautifully tailored coats, many with a swing to them that the models accentuated in their dance-like presentation. We came, we saw, we coveted. And the towers of macaroons, strawberries and kumquats were a nice touch.

—Bee-Shyuan Chang

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