Hood By Air Presents at Pitti Uomo

Hood By Air, designed by Shayne Oliver, was the latest special guest of Pitti Uomo trade show in Italy, following the likes of Kenzo, Band of Outsiders, and Haider Ackermann. The runway show — at Villa di Maiano, just outside Florence — featured the kind of evocative, gritty, androgynous looks the Brooklyn-based label has been showing in New York for several years, to much populist acclaim.

As supporting material, Hood By Air also commissioned a kind of journal depicting of the evolution of the brand. Photos of the collection as preliminary 'toile' garments are meant to show the process and details of the pieces, while photos of a road trip through England by twins Sam and Joe O'Neil, clad in archival HBA, convey the kind of dishabille and disregard that defines the brand.

Jan 15, 2015 22:25:00
Azzedine Alaïa & Naomi Campbell, Arthur Elgort (1987)

Arthur Elgort and The Big Picture

Despite opening up fashion imagery in the 1980s and embracing supermodels of the '90s, capturing many of the era's most iconic and enduring images, Arthur Elgort remains one of the industry's more underrated talents. An upcoming exhibition, The Big Picture, at Galleria Carla Sozzani aims to change that. The show encompasses five decades of his work, including several original 'snapshots,' a candid and natural style Elgort introduced into the fashion vocabulary. His ideas of what a ‘fashion’ photo was, opened up the possibilities of what fashion photography could be to the next generation.

Elgort attributes much of his liberated direction to his lifelong love of music and dance, particularly jazz and ballet from the '30s to '40s. "Some of my best pictures were taken when I wasn't 'working' — models getting ready, people on the street, the little moments in between shots," he writes in a new book, published in conjunction with the exhibit. "That's when you can really capture people as they truly are and see what's underneath. It's those real moments that just can't be faked."

Arthur Elgort: The Big Picture, February 6 - April 6, 2015, Galleria Carla Sozzani, Galleria Carla Sozzani, 10 Corso Como, Milan

Jan 04, 2015 21:10:00
Artist's rendering of John Waters after plastic surgery

John Waters and His Twisted Art

John Waters knows the built-in absurdity of any situation, whether he's hanging out with Beth Ditto at Coachella or hosting the CFDA Awards. So when the master of camp makes art of the gallery kind, which is a common occurrence, it invariably deals with the same sordid, preposterous themes as his films: faded (or never achieved) glamour, over-the-top sadism, geek love, extreme slapstick, anti-hero worship. In other words, not family fare. Which is odd, thinks Waters, because if you strip the sex, violence, and obscenities from his films, you have solidly funny stories that kids would love.

That's exactly what he'll screen at his new exhibition at Marianne Boesky gallery, among his photographic odes to bad taste. On loop will be a 74-minute video, Kiddie Flamingos, that riffs on Waters' notorious Pink Flamingos of 1972, starring Divine as a degenerate sociopath whose only goal in life is to be named "the filthiest person alive" by a tabloid. The new G-rated version is a table read of the Pink Flamingos script, but recast with child actors — in bright wigs and cat-eye glasses to evoke their original counterparts — and all explicit content removed or rewritten. It's still quite perverse — even more so, attests Waters.

John Waters, January 9 - February 14, 2015, Marianne Boesky, 509 West 24th Street, NYC


Pink Flamingos poster


John Waters, A Passion for Audrey


John Waters, Hollywood Smile Train


John Waters, Haunted


John Waters, Stalker

Jan 04, 2015 11:36:00
Björk, Debut, photo Jean Baptiste Mondino (1993)

Björk to Have Her Head Examined at MoMA

The Icelandic virtuosa known by one name is getting a major retrospective of the same name at MoMA. Opening in March 2015 and not scheduled to travel to other institutions, Björk is dedicated to the multifaceted, multimedia work of the composer, musician, and artist. It will span more than 20 years of pioneering projects and albums, from Debut (1993) to Biophilia (2011), the app for which — made with M/M Paris — was MoMA's first acquisition of its kind. Her pursuits in the realm of sound, film, visuals, costumes, and performance will be highlighted.

The installation will present a narrative — part fact and part fiction — co-written by Björk and the Icelandic writer Sjón Sigurdsson. Björk’s collaborations with video directors, photographers, fashion designers, and artists will be featured, culminating with a newly commissioned, immersive music and film experience.

Björk, March 7 - June 7, 2015, MoMA, 11 West 53rd Street, NYC


Björk, Homogenic, photo Nick Knight (1997)


Björk, photo Danny Clinch


Björk, still from All Is Full of Love, directed by Chris Cunningham (1999)

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Dec 18, 2014 17:19:00
Lorde in Karen Walker

Year of Our Lorde

Lorde had a sensational year — and wore it well. Here, a look back at her greatest style hits...


Lorde in New Zealand designer Karen Walker


Lorde in Balenciaga at the Grammy Awards


Lorde in Vionnet to perform at Nirvana's induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame


Lorde in Lanvin at the Billboard Music Awards


Lorde in Prada to launch Pradasphere in Hong Kong

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Dec 16, 2014 16:54:00
Whiskers Between My Legs

Julie Verhoeven Has a Go at Society's Notions of Femininity

Known mostly as a fashion illustrator and collaborator (Louis Vuitton, Versace), Julie Verhoeven has channeled her inner satirist to create Whiskers Between My Legs at the ICA in London. In the immersive installation, Verhoeven explores notions of femininity and its (mis)representation in popular culture by draping collaged fabrics and other mixed media throughout the space.

In addition, a new short film addressing female seduction and so-called perversion will also screen on monitors, some placed within toilet seats, thereby creating a playfully ironic environment that defies and questions perceptions of gender, etiquette, and taste.

Whiskers Between My Legs, December 9 - January 18, 2015, Institute for Contemporary Arts, The Mall, London

Dec 12, 2014 20:46:00
Beard at Somerset House

Beard Watching

If beards haven't been growing on you, an upcoming exhibit of mankind's hirsute pursuit may change your mind. Eighty portraits of assorted whiskery wonders by London photographer Brock Elbank will open at Somerset House in March. The exhibit, Beard, is the latest in Project60, an ongoing series that began when Elbank teamed up with Jimmy Niggles, founder of Beard Season. The Australian organization raises awareness about skin cancer by encouraging men to let their facial hair run wild — the ultimate sun block. 

The diverse group of participants includes actor John Hurt, Nick Wooster, tattoo artist Miles Better, and models Ricki Hall and Billy Huxley. Perhaps the most striking image is that of bearded lady Harnaam Kaur, who started growing facial hair at the age of 16, due to a hormonal imbalance caused by polycystic ovary syndrome. After various attempts at removal, she was eventually baptized a Sikh, which forbids the cutting of body hair. Et voila, problem solved.

Beard, March 5 – 29, 2015, Terrace Rooms at Somerset House, Strand London WC2R 1LA

The moving story of how Beard Season came to be... 

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Dec 12, 2014 09:33:00
Homiés (2014) by Brian Lichtenberg Studio

An Exhibit Examines the History of Fashion Fakes

'Fake it till you make it' is a well-worn refrain. But counterfeits and parodies have been a hot-button topic long before those notorious orange 'Homies' T-shirts — a barely disguised reference to Hermès — flooded the streets of L.A. or Hedi Slimane pulled Saint Laurent from Colette for selling sweatshirts emblazoned with "Ain't Laurent Without Yves." A new exhibit at the FIT museum traces sartorial copying back to early 20th-century European houses — Dior, Vionnet, Poiret, Balmain — and follows its long arc through the logomania craze of the 80s, the fast-fashion phenomenon of the aughts, and the clever, if controversial, wordplay of today.

The exhibit, Faking It, begins with a 1903 Charles Frederick Worth gown with a label the couturier had signed as an artist would sign a canvas, giving rise to the practice of sewn-in labels. The demand for counterfeits mushroomed in the ensuing decades, reaching a feverpitch with Christian Dior’s New Look collection of 1947 that launched countless imitations of the wasp silhouette. As a result, couturiers shrewdly began licensing their designs, earning a princely sum from American department stores in particular.

Several pieces by Chanel from the 1960s to the 1980s are also on view, alongside their corresponding copies. Yet surprisingly, or perhaps not, Coco Chanel remained relatively unperturbed by counterfeits. Ever the savvy marketer, she considered copies of her signature tweed suits — and there were a lot — as free publicity. “The very idea of protecting the seasonal arts is childish," she said. "One should not bother to protect that which dies the minute it is born.”

Faking It: Originals, Copies, and Counterfeits, Dec 2, 2014 – Apr 25, 2015, FIT Museum, Seventh Avenue at 27 Street, NYC


left: Chanel (1966) / right: licensed copy, Chanel (1967)


House of Worth (1903)


Moschino Cheap and Chic with Roy Lichtenstein print
 (1991)


Unlicensed copy of Madeleine Vionnet (1925)


Catherine Malendrino, eBay x CFDA anti-counterfeit campaign (2013)


Fake Louis Vuitton coat by Dapper Dan of Harlem

Dec 07, 2014 20:35:00
Daniel Arsham, Welcome to the Future

Guess Who's Coming to Art Basel: Daniel Arsham

New York artist Daniel Arsham's MO is to fossilize everyday objects, particularly communication devices, as a comment on the transient nature of media, and of art itself. At Art Basel, he's transformed Locust Projects into an excavation site deep in the gallery's floor, where thousands of calcified, petrified artifacts of the 20th century have been buried: boomboxes, cameras, electric guitars, game controllers, cell phones, VHS tapes, Walkmans, film projectors, and so on — all rendered in crystal, volcanic ash, and other minerals.

The site-specific installation derives from Arsham's childhood, specifically the year 1986, when he survived Hurricane Andrew huddled in a closet of his family's Miami home. The wreckage he discovered in the storm's wake had a profound impact on his perception of space and time, which leaves the viewer with the impression that a century has passed in a moment.

Daniel Arsham: Welcome to the Future, Locust Projects, 3852 North Miami Avenue, Miami

 

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Dec 03, 2014 13:55:00

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